The organs of Paris
ORGANS OF PARIS 2.0 © 2020 Vincent Hildebrandt HOME A-C

Chapelle de la Sorbonne

19, Rue de la Sorbonne, 75005 Paris

1825 - Louis-Paul Dallery

1983 - Dargassies*

III/23 - mechanical traction - Stoplist

* a cleaning and an inventarisation; the organ was already disabled and more than half of the pipes were lacking at that time; this proportion has increased even more the past years. Site of the organ Video of the organ
The Sorbonne Chapel is located in the Sorbonne University Complex. Since the Middle Ages, the Sorbonne College has been equipped with a chapel. It was a Gothic building in Latin cross, the layout of which can still be seen in the courtyard of the present-day Sorbonne. Rebuilt in the 17th century by Jacques Lemercier (1585-1654) on the orders of Richelieu, the Sorbonne chapel is distinguished on the outside by an original façade, and its elegant dome. The chapel, which was looted during the Revolution, now contains almost no decorations. However, an altar topped with a Christ on the cross dating from the Restoration is visible next to the cardinal's tomb.
The organ of the Sorbonne Chapel was commissioned by Pierre-François Dallery in 1825. However, it was Pierre-François Dallery's son, Louis-Paul (1797-1875) who carried out the work. The organ was inaugurated on July 10, 1825. After the chapel reopened in 1852 at the time of Napoleon III, the new chapel master, Félix Clément, an official organ expert, had the instrument restored by Louis-Paul Dallery himself. It was this one, presumably, who installed the German-like pedal in 1854 that still exists to this day. Felix Clément resigned in 1859, and the organ was now silenced. Its access was made more difficult by the removal in 1885 of the staircase which provided direct access to the tribune, outside the chapel. Currently, an association works to its restoration, which would be really desirable given the authenticity and quality of the organ.
Organs of Paris

Chapelle de la

Sorbonne

19, Rue de la Sorbonne, 75005 Paris

1825 - Louis-Paul Dallery

1983 - Dargassies*

III/23 - mechanical traction - Stoplist

* a cleaning and an inventarisation; the organ was already disabled and more than half of the pipes were lacking at that time; this proportion has increased even more the past years. Site of the organ Video of the organ
ORGANS OF PARIS 2.0 © Vincent Hildebrandt HOME A-C
The organ of the Sorbonne Chapel was commissioned by Pierre-François Dallery in 1825. However, it was Pierre- François Dallery's son, Louis-Paul (1797-1875) who carried out the work. The organ was inaugurated on July 10, 1825. After the chapel reopened in 1852 at the time of Napoleon III, the new chapel master, Félix Clément, an official organ expert, had the instrument restored by Louis-Paul Dallery himself. It was this one, presumably, who installed the German-like pedal in 1854 that still exists to this day. Felix Clément resigned in 1859, and the organ was now silenced. Its access was made more difficult by the removal in 1885 of the staircase which provided direct access to the tribune, outside the chapel. Currently, an association works to its restoration, which would be really desirable given the authenticity and quality of the organ.