The organs of Paris
ORGANS OF PARIS 2.0  © 2018 Vincent Hildebrandt                                      HOME             A-C           

Courbevoie,

Saint-Maurice-

de-Bécon

216 Rue Armand Silvestre, 92600 Courbevoie 1865 - Cavaillé-Coll

1912 - Mutin

1976 - Jean Jonet

2015 - Denis Lacorre & Laurent Plet

III/37 - mechanical traction - stoplist

 
The church St Maurice de Bécon was built between 1907 and 1910, designed in het neo-roman style by the Parisian architect Julien Barber. It has a single nave and is inspired by the primitive basilicas.

Organiste titulaire

Thomas Monnet

Concerts

Regularly

Masses with organ

Saturday 6.30 PM, Sunday 10.30 PM Video Thomas Monnet Site of the organ
The organ was built in 1865 by Aristide Cavaillé-Coll for the palatine Chapel of the marquis de Lambertye in Gerbéviller. Since this instrument was not intended for a church, Cavaillé-Coll could give free rein to his creativity. The instrument had a Physharmonica, a stop designed by the German builder Walcker: a free reed without pipes, as in a harmonium. There was also a swell box with two opposed shutters, one opening while the other closes, creating an effect of moving away from the sound, as in a German Fernwerck. There were also German influences in the stoplist, as evidenced by the names of some stops. Cavaillé-Coll used in this organ for the first time expression pedals, instead of the spoon like devices used before. In 1909, the instrument was bought from the Lambertye family by the Canon Oudin for the new Church of Courbevoie and installed by Charles Mutin in 1912. He moved the swell from the back of the case to the front. At an unknown date , after 1925, the Physharmonica was removed. In 1976, the builder Jean Jonet modified the organ towards a neoclassical style. In 2017, Denis Lacorre and Laurent Plet completed a comprehensive restoration, with the aim to restore the original concept of Cavaillé-Coll. The missing stops were reconstructed, including the Physharmonica (today called Aeoline) and moved stops were repositioned to their original places. All mechanics and the wind supply were restored and the swell was moved to its original location in order to regain the balance desired by Cavaillé-Coll.  In addition, the original II-II coupler and ‘tonnerre’ (pédale d’orage) were reconstructed and the rear side of the organ was provided with a new case to meet the conditions  in Gerbéviller.  
Organs of Paris

Courbevoie,

Saint-Maurice-

de-Bécon

216 Rue Armand Silvestre, 92600 Courbevoie 1865 - Cavaillé-Coll

1912 - Mutin

1976 - Jean Jonet

2015 - Denis Lacorre & Laurent Plet

III/37 - mechanical traction - stoplist

The church St Maurice de Bécon was built between 1907 and 1910, designed in het neo-roman style by the Parisian architect Julien Barber. It has a single nave and is inspired by the primitive basilicas. The organ was built in 1865 by Aristide Cavaillé-Coll for the palatine Chapel of the marquis de Lambertye in Gerbéviller. Since this instrument was not intended for a church, Cavaillé-Coll could give free rein to his creativity. The instrument had a Physharmonica, a stop designed by the German builder Walcker: a free reed without pipes, as in a harmonium. There was also a swell box with two opposed shutters, one opening while the other closes, creating an effect of moving away from the sound, as in a German Fernwerck. There were also German influences in the stoplist, as evidenced by the names of some stops. Cavaillé-Coll used in this organ for the first time expression pedals, instead of the spoon like devices used before. In 1909, the instrument was bought from the Lambertye family by the Canon Oudin for the new Church of Courbevoie and installed by Charles Mutin in 1912. He moved the swell from the back of the case to the front. At an unknown date known, after 1925, the Physharmonica was removed. In 1976, the builder Jean Jonet modified the organ towards a neoclassical style. In 2017, Denis Lacorre and Laurent Plet completed a comprehensive restoration, with the aim to restore the original concept of Cavaillé-Coll. The missing stops were reconstructed, including the Physharmonica (today called Aeoline) and moved stops were repositioned to their original places. All mechanics and the wind supply were restored and the swell was moved to its original location in order to regain the balance desired by Cavaillé-Coll.

Organiste titulaire

Thomas Monnet

Concerts

Regularly

Masses with organ

Saturday 6.30 PM, Sunday 10.30 PM Video Thomas Monnet
ORGANS OF PARIS 2.0 © Vincent Hildebrandt     HOME        A-C