The organs of Paris
ORGANS OF PARIS 2.0 © 2020 Vincent Hildebrandt HOME A-C

Chapelle Sainte Thérèse

(Orphelins Apprentis d'Auteuil) 40, rue La Fontaine, 75016 Paris 1931 - Abbey

III/33 (43) - électro-pneumatical traction - stoplist

(muet/silent)

The chapel In 1923, Father Daniel Brottier became in charge of the Orphans of Auteuil and decided to build a chapel when he had no funds and Auteuil's work was in a precarious financial situation. A benefactor contributed the necessary money to start the work. The chapel, designed by architects Henri Chailleux father and son, is in neo-Gothic style. It is inspired by the Sainte Chapelle. The organ The instrument was built in 1930-1931 by Abbey in collaboration with Henri Libert who was responsible for the artistic design. The electropneumatic traction (with box chests patented by Casavant) was designed on the plans and indications of Casavant, which was totally innovative for the time. At that time, it allowed more than 80 combinations to be recorded. The instrument was housed in a magnificent two-body buffet designed by Rude and executed by Auteuil's apprentices. Today, the instrument is silent and replaced by an electronic organ.
Organs of Paris

Chapelle Sainte

Thérèse

(Orphelins Apprentis d'Auteuil) 40, rue La Fontaine, 75016 Paris 1931 - Abbey

III/33 (43) - électro-pneumatical traction - stoplist

(muet/silent)

ORGANS OF PARIS 2.0 © Vincent Hildebrandt HOME A-C
The chapel In 1923, Father Daniel Brottier became in charge of the Orphans of Auteuil and decided to build a chapel when he had no funds and Auteuil's work was in a precarious financial situation. A benefactor contributed the necessary money to start the work. The chapel, designed by architects Henri Chailleux father and son, is in neo-Gothic style. It is inspired by the Sainte Chapelle. The organ The instrument was built in 1930-1931 by Abbey in collaboration with Henri Libert who was responsible for the artistic design. The electropneumatic traction (with box chests patented by Casavant) was designed on the plans and indications of Casavant, which was totally innovative for the time. At that time, it allowed more than 80 combinations to be recorded. The instrument was housed in a magnificent two-body buffet designed by Rude and executed by Auteuil's apprentices. Today, the instrument is silent and replaced by an electronic organ.